Happiness in the Park, 9th weekly meeting

Join us Sunday, August 25th in Rosenaupark, Nuremberg, from 10 to 12, to practice Meditation, Mindfulness and Qi Gong. Bring your happiness, too!

This will be the 8th Happiness in the Park weekly meeting.

Happiness in the Park logo
Happiness in the Park

As usual, we will practice meditation, mindfulness, and Qi Gong for a couple of hours, but, most important of all, we will be practising shared happiness!

We will be able to meet us in person, share with you our happiness, and let this amazing group grow.

Dress casually and comfortable, of course.

Bring with you a small mat, or a tarp, to sit on the grass, some water to remain hydrated, a notebook if you want to take notes.

So, bring your happiness to share!

https://www.facebook.com/events/404991343477938/

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Some data about Happiness in the Park

Liu Zi Jue (六字訣) or Six Healing Sounds

Dai-Hara Kizendo uses Liu Zi Jue (六字訣) or Six Healing Sounds as one of its commonly practiced Qi Gong Exercises, in the MMQG (Meditation, Mindfulness, and Qi Gong) syllabus.

This exercise requires attention and should be learned by following the instructions of a teacher. You will find in this article a general explanation of its benefits and practice.

introduction

Liu Zi Jue is one of the traditional Qi Gong exercises, as recognized by the Chinese Health Qigong Association.

It is an exercise that regulates and enables the practitioner to control the levels of Qi inside the body through specific inhalation and exhalation process and using sounds to be pronounced with peculiar mouth forms. The exercise is a way to improve health, reduce stress, and promote self-healing.

The term Liu Zi Jue first appears in the Chinese text Yangsheng Yanming Lu (養生延命錄, or Extracts on Nourishing Spiritual Nature and Prolonging Bodily Life) , written by Tao Hongjing (陶弘景) , a famous writer, calligrapher, alchemist, astronomer and pharmacologist, who lived during the period of the Southern and Northern Dynasties (420-589).
For what we know, at that time the Liu Zi Jue consisted just of the sounds. Only later, during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), the associated body movements where added to the exercise.

The six healing sounds are :

  • XU 噓 – ‘hiss’ – regulates the Liver Qi
  • HE 呵 – ‘yawn’ or ‘laughing sound’ – regulates the Heart Qi
  • HU 呼 –  ‘to sigh,’ ‘to exhale,’ or ‘to call’ – regulates the Spleen/Pancreas Qi
  • SI 呬 – ‘to rest’ – regulates the Lungs Qi
  • CHUI 吹  – ‘to blow out,’ ‘to blast,’ or ‘to puff’ – regulates the Kidneys Qi
  • XI 嘻 – ‘mirthful’ – regulates the San Jiao 三焦 (Triple Burner) Qi

San Jiao refers not to a real, specific physical organ but represents the energetic channels that run through the upper, middle and lower parts of the body.
In TCM, one of its main functions is to regulate Qi and the body fluids that surround the internal organs.

Characteristics

The Six healing Sound exercise, to be effective, must be performed paying attention to a series of factors.
The most important ones are the following:

Mouth forms

Liu Zi Jue uses six sounds, that must be pronounced with six special mouth forms and methods of pronunciation.

Combining breathing and movements

You can combine the sounds with specific physical movement to enhance the positive effect of the resonating words.

calm and floW

During the practice each movement should be performed calmly and keeping an uninterrupted flow. The breath should be deep and regular, so to promote relaxation and concentration.

Practitioners of these exercises report not only that they have experienced a general improvement in their health and general quality of life but also they had measurable clinical improvements in treating hypertension, hyperlipidemia and high blood sugar.

How the Liu Zi Jue Work

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), there are five major organs — Heart (), Liver (), Spleen (), Lungs () and Kidney ().
These five organs did not represent exactly the anatomical organs. Rather, they describe the functions that the organ carries on. Also, each organ can have a Yin and Yang function, and each Yin organ is paired with a correspondent Yang one.

These functions are called Zàng Fǔ (脏腑). Zang indicates the Yin organs, Fu the Yang ones.
The Yin organs are: Heart (), Liver (), Spleen (), Lungs () and Kidney (), the Yang ones: Small Intestine (小肠), Large Intestine (大肠), Gall Bladder (), Bladder (膀胱), Stomach (), and Sān Jiaō.

Each of the five organs is associated to an element: fire, earth, metal, water or wood.
It is thought that each organ resonates to a specific sound, and that using that sound one can remove congested, blocked Qi from the organ and fill the organ itself with fresh, clear Qi.

Blocked Qi pain, discomfort or illness. Each organ has specific symptoms to show a congested Qi. An expert TCM practitioner can help you find which organ is affected.

The Six Healing Sounds resonate in the organ and expels the congested Qi through breathing, bringing in fresh one.

How to practice Liu Zi Jue

There are several ways to use the Liu Zi Jue, but you can use it or in its complete form or just in those parts that can help improving your current health.

For general health maintenance, you should practice the six healing sounds in the following order:
Xū (Wood) → Hē (Fire) → Hū (Earth) → Sī (Metal) → Chuī (Water) → Xī (Wood). This order is based on the mutual generation (相生 – xiang sheng) sequence of the five elements (五行相生).

To promote healing, you can alter the order of the sounds in the sequence and use this one instead:
Hē (Fire) → Sī (Metal) → Xū (Wood) → Hū (Earth) → Chuī (Water) → Xī (Wood). This order is based on the mutual overcoming (相克 – xiang kè) of the five elements (五行相剋).

The five elements are, of course: Wood (木 – mù), Fire (火 – huǒ), Earth (土 – tǔ), Metal (金 – jīn), and Water (水 – shuǐ).

As told before, you can choose to practice just the sound that is associated with the current season or the current condition you want to address. Remember that Xī 嘻 , can be practiced all year round to support the San Jiao.

The sounds are associated to the five elements, the five organs plus the San Jiao, and to the four seasons as follows:

  • XU 噓LiverWoodSpring
  • HE 呵 HeartFireSummer
  • HU 呼Spleen/Pancreas EarthAll Seasons
  • SI 呬 LungsMetalAutumn
  • CHUI 吹  – KidneysWaterWinter
  • XI 嘻San Jiao WoodAll Seasons

When you practice this exercise, remember to pay attention to always breathe in through your nose and breathe out from your mouth.
Repeat each sound six times, and practice the sequence or the part you chose three times a day.

Before starting the Liu Zi Jue, you can warm you up using your normal Qi Gong sequence.

Keep your back straight, chin parallel to the ground, eyes open but not looking at anything. Breathe into the lower dantian and center yourself.
Free your mind and leave all the thoughts pass through it without being attached to them.

Perform the sounds as it has been taught by your teacher.

End the sequence by rubbing the palms in circles around the lower abdomen.
Men will put their right hand over the left one, while women will put their left hand over the right one.
Do 36 rotations clockwise, then 36 counter-clock wise.

Happiness in the Park, 8th weekly meeting

Join us Sunday, August 18th in Rosenaupark, Nuremberg, from 10 to 12, to practice Meditation, Mindfulness and Qi Gong. Bring your happiness, too!

This will be the 8th Happiness in the Park weekly meeting.

Happiness in the Park logo
Happiness in the Park

As usual, we will practice meditation, mindfulness, and Qi Gong for a couple of hours, but, most important of all, we will be practising shared happiness!

We will be able to meet us in person, share with you our happiness, and let this amazing group grow.

Dress casually and comfortable, of course.

Bring with you a small mat, or a tarp, to sit on the grass, some water to remain hydrated, a notebook if you want to take notes.

So, bring your happiness to share!

https://www.facebook.com/events/332191317664605/

Qi Gong styles

Qi Gong comes in many different forms.

As it has a millenary history, Qi Gong has naturally evolved, so now there is not a single Qi Gong school or style and each school or style has at least one set of movements and exercises.

The first written mention of Qi is dated sometime around 1123 B.C., in the I Ching (易經 – Yi Jing or Book of Changes), where it can be found references to three natural energies, the San Cai: Tian (the Heavens), Di (the Earth), and Ren (the Man).

So, about 550 B.C., Lao Zi, the founder of Taoism, wrote in his Dao De Jing that in older times there were breathing techniques to build and enhance Qi.

Legend narrates that an Indian monk, named Bodhidharma (Da Mo in Chinese), arrived in China at the end of the 5th or the beginning of 6th century A.D., and, after his practice had been rejected by the Emperor, went to Shaolin monastery. There, he found that the health of the monks was really poor, so after 9 years of study he proposed a series of exercises to improve this condition. Some of these exercises are now part of the practice of Qi Gong.

The Qi Gong forms taught by Bodhidharma are described in two books:

Yì Jīn Jīng (易筋经Muscle-Tendon Changing Classic)
Xi Sui Jing (洗髓经Bone Marrow Cleansing Classic)
(plus the Luohan Shou (十八羅漢手 – 18 Luohan Hands), the first set of Kung Fu routine)

Qi Gong evolved in many different ways since then, being divided in 5 main schools:

Chinese Medical Qi Gong
Daoist Qi Gong
Buddhist Qi Gong
Confucian Qi Gong
Wu Shu / Kung Fu Qi Gong

and 5 main categories:

Health Qi Gong
Medical Qi Gong
Life Improving Qi Gong
Physical conditioning Qi Gong
Meditative Qi Gong

In 2003, the Chinese Health Qigong Association officially recognized four health qigong forms:

Ba Duan Jin (八段錦 – Eight Pieces of Brocade)
Yì Jīn Jīng (易筋經 – Muscle-Tendon Change Classic)
Wu Qin Xi ( 五禽戲 – Five Animals)
Liu Zi Jue (六字訣 – Six Healing Sounds)

And, just 7 years later, 5 additional forms were added to the official syllabus:

Tai Chi Yang Sheng Zhang (太極養生杖 Tai Chi Stick Health Preservation Routine)
Shi Er Duan Jin (十二段錦 – 12 Pieces of Brocade Sitting Qi Gong)
Daoyin Yang Sheng Gong Shi Er Fa (導引養生功十二法12 routines from Daoyin tradition)
Mawangdui Daoyin (馬王堆導引术Mawangdui Silk Paintings Qi Gong )
Da Wu (大舞Big Dance)

In addition to the official exercises there are many other schools and movements, and I will make another post to try to collect some of those. What is most important to you, as a practitioner, is to understand that all Qi Gong is made for helping you develop and use Qi through movement, respiration, and meditation.

In the Dai-Hara Kizendo we study and practice the following sets:

Ba Duan Jin (八段錦 – Eight Pieces of Brocade)
Xi Sui Jing (洗髓经Bone Marrow Cleansing Classic)
Yì Jīn Jīng (易筋經 – Muscle-Tendon Change Classic)
Wu Qin Xi ( 五禽戲 – Five Animals)
Liu Zi Jue (六字訣 – Six Healing Sounds)


Free to Achieve – the book

My new book “Free to Achieve” is available in paperback and ebook format on Amazon.

Free to Achieve – a book by Raffaello Palandri. ebook edition

It’s a 7 steps manual to guide you to get a healthier, wealthier, happier personal and professional life by using easy yet highly effective tools to set goals, plan for them, and achieve the results you want.

Get rid of stress, anxiety, low self-esteem, lack of commitment by practicing meditation, mindfulness and Qi Gong.

The book is an introduction to the Yourself, Understood Happiness Coaching Method, a method developed in more than 23 years of experience on the field.

Free to Achieve – a book by Raffaello Palandri, paperback edition

This manual, the first of a series, is a collection of practical tools to allow the readers getting immediate and consistent results in their personal and professional life. The tools are designed to be used since day one without any previous requirement and can be applied to businesses, sports, family environment.

The readers will be guided step by step towards a better understanding of themselves, so that they will grow in awareness, compassion, and commitment.

Happiness in the Park, 6th weekly meeting

The next Happiness in the Park weekly meeting of Nuremberg Happiness Group is scheduled for Sunday August 4th at Rosenaupark in Nuremberg, from 10:00 to 12:00.

Happiness in the Park logo
Happiness in the Park

As usual, we will practice meditation, mindfulness, and Qi Gong for a couple of hours, but, most important of all, we will be practising shared happiness!

We will be able to meet us in person, share with you our happiness, and let this amazing group grow.

Dress casually and comfortable, of course.

Bring with you a small mat, or a tarp, to sit on the grass, some water to remain hydrated, a notebook if you want to take notes.

So, bring your happiness to share!

https://www.facebook.com/events/697912420631493/

Happiness in the Park, 5th weekly meeting

The next Happiness in the Park weekly meeting of Nuremberg Happiness Group is scheduled for Sunday July 28th at Rosenaupark in Nuremberg, from 10:00 to 12:00.

Happiness in the Park logo
Happiness in the Park

As usual, we will practice meditation, mindfulness, and Qi Gong for a couple of hours, but, most important of all, we will be practising shared happiness!

We will be able to meet us in person, share with you our happiness, and let this amazing group grow.

Dress casually and comfortable, of course.

Bring with you a small mat, or a tarp, to sit on the grass, some water to remain hydrated, a notebook if you want to take notes.

So, bring your happiness to share!

https://www.facebook.com/events/364718537572850/

Happiness in the Park, 4th weekly meeting

The next Happiness in the Park weekly meeting of Nuremberg Happiness Group is scheduled for Sunday July 21st at Rosenaupark in Nuremberg, from 10:00 to 12:00.

Happiness in the Park logo
Happiness in the Park

As usual, we will practice meditation, mindfulness, and Qi Gong for a couple of hours, but, most important of all, we will be practising shared happiness!

We will be able to meet us in person, share with you our happiness, and let this amazing group grow.

Dress casually and comfortable, of course.

Bring with you a small mat, or a tarp, to sit on the grass, some water to remain hydrated, a notebook if you want to take notes.

So, bring your happiness to share!

https://www.facebook.com/events/387975588493330/